Buffalo Bills General Manager Brandon Beane and Wife Hayley Kick Off “Bills Muttfia” for SPCA Serving Erie County Animals

September 12, 2020
By: SPCA Chief Communications Officer Gina Lattuca

UPDATE 1/18/21: The Buffalo Bills are well into the playoffs, and Sunday night’s game against the Kansas City Chiefs will be a big one. The game will not be a home game, but Hayley Beane tells us today that BILLS MUTTFIA drafts will continue this weekend! We want NOTHING to destroy the mojo that’s bringing us all the way to SUPER BOWL LV! On behalf of #BillsMuttfia rookies past & future, thank you, Hayley & Brandon!

The Beane Family

 

Another member of the Buffalo Bills will be scoring for the animals at the SPCA Serving Erie County this football season!

Buffalo Bills General Manager Brandon Beane and his wife, Hayley, will pay the adoption fee of one animal for every home game touchdown all season long!

The Bills Muttfia program, conceived by the Beanes, picks up where Hauschpups left off.

Last season, former Bills kicker Stephen Hauschka and his wife, Lindsey, paid the adoption fee of one dog, or Hauschpup, for every home field goal kicked. Because Stephen is no longer with the team, Lindsey, an ardent animal lover, asked friend Hayley if there was any way the program could be continued in some form.

The Beanes, staunch supporters of pet adoption and owners of two rescue dogs (Bodie and Peanut Beane, pictured here!), immediately jumped at the chance to reimagine a similar program to help the SPCA Serving Erie County place animals with loving families more quickly.

For every home game touchdown scored by the Buffalo Bills, the Beanes will pay the adoption fee of one SPCA animal. Dogs, cats, small animals, birds, reptiles, even farm animals will be drafted into the Bills Muttfia depending on the SPCA’s population on game day. New Muttfia team members will be announced on the SPCA’s social media platforms (Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram) at noon the day after each home game.

“No matter what happens at work, good day, bad day, you win 40 to nothing, lose 40 to nothing, your dogs are fired up to see you when you come in the door, and that’s a cool feeling, the love and nurturing that they bring to the family,” Brandon Beane says in a BuffaloBills.com video focused on the Beanes and the importance of pet adoption.

“I think adopting is so important because you have shelters that are just full,” says Hayley, who toured the SPCA’s 300 Harlem Rd., West Seneca shelter Sept. 10, in the same video.

This season’s Bills Muttfia draft will begin with the Buffalo Bills’ first home game Sunday, September 13, against the New York Jets.

For more on Bills Muttfia, watch this BuffaloBills.com video or read Vic Carucci’s article in the Buffalo News.

See the animals drafted into the Bills Muttfia this season right here >>

See adoptable animals at the SPCA Serving Erie County >>

 

SPCA ISSUES WINTER PET SAFETY TIPS

January 6, 2021
By: Gina Lattuca, SPCA Chief Communications Officer

It’s been a mild winter so far, but as Buffalonians, one thing we know for sure is that we will face a bit more snow and wind, and we’ll probably go through at least one frigid temperature phase. This year is different from other years, however, in that it’s a little more complicated to receive emergency veterinary care, as veterinary clinics (including the low-cost Lipsey Veterinary Clinic at the SPCA) strive to comply with COVID-related guidelines.  Plan ahead for the upcoming freezing days and nights now to ensure your pets stay safe and healthy throughout the winter months. Read on for some of the SPCA Serving Erie County’s winter pet safety tips.

*OUTDOOR ANIMAL SHELTER MUST BE SUITABLE FOR INCLEMENT WEATHER: …and if it’s not, animal welfare officers can rescue the pet even before he or she shows signs of suffering, thanks to New York State’s Shelter Law that went into effect in 2003. Thanks to a legislative push in late 2018 that led to stronger laws concerning the tethering of dogs within Buffalo city limits, the SPCA and other law enforcement organizations can now take even more steps to ensure dogs are protected from the elements.

* Keep a Tight Leash:
Never let your dog off the leash on snow or ice, especially during a snowstorm. Pets can lose their scent on snow and ice, especially if snow is falling at a fast rate, and your pet can easily lose his sense of direction. Pets may also panic during a snowstorm and run away; many pets are lost during the winter months. Remember to keep current identification on your pet at all times!

*Keep Pets At Home: Never leave your pet alone in a car during cold weather. A car can act as a refrigerator in the winter, holding in the cold. Your pet could literally freeze to death.

*Always Dry Pet’s Wet Feet: Thoroughly wipe off your pet’s legs and stomach when she comes in and out of the rain, snow or ice. Check her sensitive foot pads, which may be bleeding from snow or ice encrusted in them. Your pet may also pick up salt and other chemicals on her feet accidentally. These chemicals could hurt her if she swallows them while licking her feet.

*Lay Straw for Dogs’ Visits Outdoors: Can’t get your dog to wear booties? Lay straw on top of snow for trips outdoors by dogs reluctant to step out onto a freezing surface to relieve themselves.

*Check Cars for Cats: During the winter, stray or neglected cats outdoors sometimes sleep under the hood of the car where it’s warm and comfortable. If you start the motor, cats could get caught in or flung about by the fan belt, causing serious injury or death. To prevent this, bang loudly on the hood and sides of your car before turning on the ignition to give the cat a chance to escape.

*Keep Outdoor ‘Sessions’ Short: Take your dog outside only for as long as it takes for him to relieve himself. Dogs, particularly small, short-haired breeds like Chihuahuas and terriers, suffer from the cold despite their seemingly warm fur coats. Live within Buffalo city limits? Don’t forget Buffalo’s new laws pertaining to tethering dogs in inclement weather..

*Bathe Pets Only When Necessary: Your pet runs the chance of catching a cold when wet, especially in cold weather. If you absolutely must bathe your pet, consult a professional groomer or veterinarian.

*Keep Pets Warm: Limit the clipping of your pet’s hair in the cold winter months, keeping your pet as warm as possible. Brush your pet daily in lieu of clipping to keep your pet’s coat healthy, shiny, clean and mat-free. Make sure your pet has a warm place to sleep far away from outside drafts.

*Hungry Pets: Speak to your veterinarian about increasing your pet’s supply of food, particularly protein, to keep his fur thick and healthy through the winter months. Inquire about vitamin and oil supplements.

*ANTIFREEZE IS POISON TO PETS: ANTIFREEZE, EVEN IN SMALL DOSES, IS A LETHAL POISON FOR DOGS AND CATS! Because of its sweet taste, animals are attracted to it. Be sure to clean up spills thoroughly, and consider switching to an animal-friendly antifreeze. Ensure that, if you store Antifreeze in a garage, shed, or other places accessible to your pets, it is well out of pets’ reach.

If your pet becomes lost, be sure to visit YourSPCA.org’s Lost and Found page for recommendations on where to post lost pet listings, and tips for finding your lost pets.

For more tips regarding keeping pets safe and healthy during the winter, contact the SPCA at 716-875-7360, or call the Lipsey Veterinary Clinic at the SPCA, 716-531-4700.

 

 

Tommy the Cat: Reunited for Christmas! One Stray Cat’s Buffalo-to-North Carolina Journey Home for the Holidays

December 10, 2020
By: SPCA Serving Erie County Chief Communications Officer Gina Lattuca

See Tommy’s video here >>
“Reunited for Christmas” sounds like a favorite holiday movie with a fantasy ending. For Tommy the cat, however, this holiday fantasy ending was real!

Tommy, a sweet kitten, was adopted  at the SPCA Serving Erie County by then-Buffalo resident Frances Grinage back in June of 2018.  As part of his adoption, Tommy was microchipped at the SPCA. Frances says he fit right into her Buffalo home, where he lived with other four-footed friends…among them, dogs CoCo and Baby.

Frances tells us that every night, Tommy, CoCo, and Baby contentedly shared her bed for their nightly slumber, and that every morning, Tommy would wake her up with a “kiss” on the nose.

In August of 2020, Frances found herself on the move to North Carolina. Tommy, however, had other plans; as Frances was packing up the car to leave, Tommy escaped. Frances said she searched high and low and wanted to remain in Buffalo until she found Tommy, but finally had to begin her road trip without her beloved boy.

Jump ahead to earlier this December week. A good Samaritan who found a very sweet, stray cat arrived at the SPCA to surrender the kitty. It turns out this sweet cat was microchipped…and that chip identified Tommy’s owner as Frances.

When Frances received the call that Tommy had been found (approximately one mile from where Frances had lived!), she said she was elated! “I couldn’t believe it!” said Frances. “I felt like my heart was going to explode! All I wanted for Christmas was to have my Tommy back.”

The SPCA team went to work, and on Wednesday, December 9 (coincidentally during the annual SPCA T-Mobile Radiothon with Newsradio 930 WBEN and Star 102.5 FM Radio!), with a little help from the SPCA’s Cary Munschauer, Tommy packed his bags and headed to the Buffalo airport for his 1:30 p.m. flight to North Carolina!

As pictured here, Tommy patiently awaited his departure at the airport…seems he had a little bit to say when it was slightly delayed…but Tommy’s flight was closely monitored and it appeared to be a smooth trip home.

Frances contacted us early this morning to say that Tommy arrived safely home, and was resting after his travels! “He cried a lot at first, and was extremely nervous. He finally settled down around 8 p.m.”

Frances added that a 4 1/2-month break apparently did nothing to change Tommy’s routine! Right away, Frances tells us, “…he did recognize me and also CoCo and Baby! We all slept together again! It felt like old times.”

Even during a year as difficult as 2020, Tommy’s tale proves that miracles really do happen, especially in the City of Good Neighbors. An entire community came together to help this cat reunite with his loving mom and family.

“I’m truly happy he’s home,” says Frances. “Thank you and the entire staff of the SPCA for my early Christmas gift!”

See Tommy in this video re-telling of his story:

You can help make miracles like this happen at the SPCA Serving Erie County every day! Make your gift today >> 

William Mattar ‘Rescue a Shelter Animal’ Campaign Features SPCA Serving Erie County’s Unending Work

November 24, 2020

UPDATE, DECEMBER 4, 2020: See more on this campaign on WKBW-TV’s AM Buffalo!
___________________________________________________

Car accident attorney William Mattar recently teamed up with the SPCA Serving Erie County to produce a new television commercial showcasing the SPCA’s tireless and vital work. The spot premiered during the law firm’s annual Rescue a Shelter Animal campaign and features several clips of what happens behind the scenes at the humane society, echoing the message that the SPCA NEVER STOPS.

“From our Rescue a Shelter Animal campaign, we have been able to learn so much about the SPCA Serving Erie County. Our campaign has always focused on rescuing animals. As important as that still is, and in growing our relationship with the Erie County SPCA, we learned that they never stop serving our community. By sponsoring the SPCA and developing this commercial, we wanted the public to be aware of all the vital work they do and encourage everyone to support them at this crucial time. Because once you see it firsthand, you want to help, and you feel a sense of responsibility to make everyone else around you aware,” said William Mattar, pictured here with Peanut Butter Mattar.

“We at the SPCA take that word ‘serving’ in our name very seriously,” says Gina Lattuca, SPCA Serving Erie County chief communications officer. “During this COVID phase, with the patient support of our community members, services like animal rescue, cruelty investigations, wildlife rehabilitation, animal adoptions and admissions, and more still haven’t stopped. We’re incredibly thankful to William Mattar and his team for allowing us to share that message and, in this commercial, provide a rare, behind-the-scenes peek into the work going on every day at the SPCA Serving Erie County.”

Before an animal is paired with its forever home, the SPCA staff and volunteers work tirelessly preparing animals for adoption, including behavioral development, training, providing veterinary care, and everything in between. “Without their ongoing efforts to prepare these animals for a smooth and lasting transition to their forever homes, adoptions would not be successful,” said William Mattar. With the launch of this commercial and through the law firm’s Rescue a Shelter Animal campaign, William Mattar encourages the public to support the SPCA Serving Erie County by providing donations that go directly towards rescuing animals, providing essential resources, and fighting animal cruelty.

William Mattar covered the cost of the SPCA Serving Erie County commercial and has donated all the airtime.  The commercial is available below, or watch it on the William Mattar Rescue a Shelter Animal campaign page (beneath the Pet Photo Contest information).

For more information, visit www.WilliamMattar.com.

NO BONES ABOUT IT…KEEP PETS SAFE THIS THANKSGIVING

November 23, 2020
By: SPCA Chief Communications Officer Gina Lattuca

Yes, Thanksgiving looks very different this year than in years past. No matter how small the celebrations, however, many people are still planning on preparing holiday meals, and those delicious smells are enough to drive any four-legged critter into a food frenzy.  The SPCA Serving Erie County has issued these holiday reminders to keep your pets safe, slim, and trim:

HUNGRY PETS: Too many holiday treats won’t only pack the pounds on us…they’ll pack them on our pets. Many pets are on standard, limited diets; feeding them large quantities of food they don’t normally receive could cause abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhea, none of which are welcome during this festive holiday…or at any other time, for that matter. Use discretion. Turkey bones are also dangerous for pets. A brittle, spiky bone could cause irritation of the stomach or intestines, or could lodge in your pet’s esophagus.
NOTE: Dogs eating foods to which they’re not accustomed may experience BLOAT, a life-threatening condition. Dogs experiencing bloat may have difficulty breathing, may appear weak and/or depressed, may attempt to vomit but cannot, and/or may appear to be extremely uncomfortable for no apparent reason. If your pet exhibits signs of bloat, bring him to a veterinarian as soon as possible. Speak with your veterinarian for more information on this condition.

NO BREAD FOR BARNEY:  Think twice before leaving that homemade bread dough atop the oven to rise. According to the ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control Center, when bread dough is ingested, an animal’s body heat causes the dough to rise in the stomach. As alcohol is produced during the rising process, the dough expands. Pets who have eaten bread dough may experience abdominal pain, vomiting, disorientation and depression.

PEANUT BUTTER WARNING: Using peanut butter as a holiday treat for your pet? Remember to check the label! Xylitol is a sugar substitute now added to some peanut butters, along with other foods and candies. It’s safe for most humans, but deadly to pets, even in small quantities!  Be sure to check labels for Xylitol or other ingredients that could be dangerous for your pet. It’s also a bad idea to give any animal caffeine-laced peanut butter or other foods; serious health problems could ensue.


GARBAGE PICKERS?
  Some animals patiently wait for the chance to pick through the garbage when you’re not around. Aluminum foils with juices, plastic wraps with frostings, even tasty strings from tying turkeys…well, the temptation can just be too much for your deprived pets. Keep your garbage bags away from where pets can chew through them to get to the goods. Ingestion of these items can be life-threatening.

SWEET TEMPTATIONS: CHOCOLATE CAN BE FATAL TO PETS!  Chocolate contains a substance called Theobromine, a compound very similar to caffeine in structure. Theobromine can be toxic to dogs and cats in small quantities, causing vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, seizures, rapid and irregular heartbeats, muscle tremors, coma, even death. Keep chocolate safely away from all animals.

POTPOURRI PROBLEMS:  Of course we want our homes to smell nice when guests arrive…but be mindful that liquid and other types of potpourri, especially sprinkled into rugs, along with many scented essential candles and oils are toxic to dogs, cats, even birds and other animals.

For additional holiday medical reminders, speak with your veterinarian, or call the SPCA’s Lipsey Clinic: 716-531-4700.

DOG ADOPTION & VISITATION APPOINTMENTS AT THE
SPCA SERVING ERIE COUNTY, NY

We know. It’s frustrating. It’s frustrating for us too. And we know the dogs aren’t crazy about it either.

But dog adoption and visitation appointments, while time-consuming and inconvenient, are the best way to keep members of our community, our volunteers, and our staff members healthy and safe during this COVID Response period.

Find the answers to some of the questions you may have regarding dog visitation and adoptions below.


“Why do I need to make an appointment to adopt a dog?”
We at the SPCA Serving Erie County love all our animals equally, of course…we can’t play favorites! However, our dogs seem to attract a higher number of visitors. To comply with COVID-era occupancy guidelines, we minimize traffic in our kennel/dog areas through appointment adoptions. This is to help preserve the health and safety of our visitors, as well as the health and safety of our volunteers and staff members.

“Do I need appointments to adopt other animals?”
While dog adoptions require appointments Monday – Saturday, appointments are not necessary for other animals Monday – FRIDAY. Appointments are required for CAT adoptions on Saturdays. The reason? Saturdays are our biggest adoption day and often attract hundreds of potential adopters, and with current occupancy guidelines, we just can’t allow this (as much as we’d like to).

“How do I make an appointment?”
Make your appointment by calling 716-875-7360, ext. 207. PLEASE LEAVE ONLY ONE MESSAGE! Your call will be returned in the order it was received.

“I left a message earlier today. Why hasn’t anyone called me back yet? Should I leave another message?”
The SPCA averages approximately 100 dog appointment request phone messages each day. That’s no exaggeration. EACH DAY. Your call will be returned in the order it was received. However, because our community is filled with so many dog-lovers who want to visit, it may not be returned the same day. Depending on the number of messages left before yours, your call may not be returned by our Adoptions crew for one or two business days. Please do not leave additional messages!

“When can I expect my appointment to be scheduled? Will it be the same day?”
Because we receive about 100 requests for an appointment per day, but can only allow approximately 10 appointments per day to adhere to COVID-era occupancy guidelines, it’s possible your appointment will not be scheduled to take place for at least one week in the future, usually longer. That means the dogs pictured at https://YourSPCA.org/Adoptable-Animals the day your call is returned will (hopefully) already be in new, loving homes by the time you are scheduled to come in. We understand how frustrating this can be, especially when you fall in love with a dog just through a photo on our website. We’re betting, though, that an all-new population of dogs will be available during your visit, and (hopefully) that you will find the love of your life that day!

“What if that DOESN’T happen? What if I DON’T find a new dog the day I visit? How do I make another appointment?”
Because you already had to wait what may have been a long time to visit the SPCA, we won’t make you call again! Before you leave the building, please stop at the Adoptions Desk. Your next appointment will be scheduled then and there, and you’ll be given your date and time to return.

“What should I do when I arrive for my scheduled appointment?”
Please note all visitors are required to wear masks upon entering the SPCA, and are asked to adhere to social distancing. When you arrive, simply check in at our Adoptions Desk! This way we’ll know you’re here and will be able to assist you and answer any questions you may have! For COVID tracing purposes, we will require the names of everyone in your party.

“What if I can’t make my scheduled appointment?”
Out of consideration for others just like you who want to bring a new family member into the home, we ask that you take a moment to call (you will be given a special cancellation number at the time your appointment is scheduled) and leave a message cancelling your appointment. This will allow us to schedule another potential adopter in your place, and hopefully another animal will be taken to a new home as early as possible. We appreciate the time you take to cancel, allowing another family to fill your spot.

“This appointment process is so complicated, and I’m missing out on a lot of dogs I think I would have liked to adopt. Isn’t there an easier way?”
Believe us, we understand. We’re in the business of finding loving, new homes for animals, and have dedicated our lives to doing just that. We, too, find this process frustrating, and would like nothing more than to clear the shelter in a day’s time. However, while this system is quite a bit more complicated, we’re willing to do whatever it takes to safely remain open and find new homes for these beautiful animals; right now, this is the safest way we can do just that while obeying COVID occupancy guidelines. Like you, we can’t wait until this is all over. That’s why your patience and understanding are incredibly appreciated by our staff and volunteers.

“What if I want to adopt an animal other than a dog? Do I need an appointment?”
Yes AND No!  For cats and other small animals Monday through FRIDAY, just visit  11 a.m. through 4 p.m. (Our Adoptions Department closes at 5 p.m., however, you’ll need time to look around and hopefully begin the adoption process, so you’ll want to arrive no later than 4 p.m.) Appointments ARE required to adopt these animals on Saturdays. Please note all visitors are required to wear masks upon entering the SPCA, and are asked to adhere to social distancing. We will need the names of everyone in your party for COVID tracing purposes. Due to occupancy guidelines, depending on the number of people already visiting the animals you came to visit, you may have to wait in an overflow area or in your car until people exit the building.

“Where can I find more information?”
Find more on our COVID Response Phase adoption guidelines here >>
Find answers to other adoption questions here >>
Find photos and listings of adoptable animals here >>

THANK YOU FOR YOUR PATIENCE AS WE WORK TOGETHER TO FIND NEW HOMES FOR AS MANY ANIMALS AS POSSIBLE IN A SAFE, HEALTHY MANNER!

–Gina Lattuca, SPCA Serving Erie County Chief Communications Officer

FREE ADOPTIONS TO CURRENT, PAST MEMBERS OF MILITARY DURING VETS & PETS, PRESENTED BY GEICO®

October 31, 2020
By: SPCA Chief Communications Officer Gina Lattuca

To celebrate the men and women of the armed services this Veterans Day, the SPCA Serving Erie County offers Vets & Pets, waiving adoption fees on most animals five months and older for individuals on active duty, reserves, and honorable discharge, along with service-disabled veterans and those retired from military service!

Vets & Pets begins Sunday, November 1 and runs through Veterans Day Wednesday, November 11 at the SPCA’s 300 Harlem Rd., West Seneca shelter and all SPCA offsite adoption locations. (Please note, the SPCA’s West Seneca shelter is closed Sunday, Nov. 1 and Sunday, Nov. 8, but many offsite adoption locations are open.)

Military ID or DD214 will need to be presented.

November 2020’s Vets & Pets program is proudly presented by GEICO®.

Contact SPCA Adoptions with any questions: 716-875-7360, ext. 233.

SEE ADOPTABLE ANIMALS >>
SEE OFFSITE ADOPTION LOCATIONS >>

The SPCA Serving Eeeerie County’s Scary-Good,
Spine-Tingling Cat Sale Starts October 26!

October 23, 2020
By: SPCA Chief Communications Officer Gina Lattuca

No tricks, all treats this week as the SPCA Serving Erie County presents its first-ever SCARY-GOOD, SPINE-TINGLING CAT SALE!

Monday, Oct. 26 through Friday, Oct. 30, adopt a boo-tiful cat three years or older at the SPCA’s 300 Harlem Rd., West Seneca site or any off-site adoption location, and pay the cat’s age, $1 per year! 

Adoption fees include spay/neuter surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations, initial worming, feline leukemia test, microchip, temporary identification tag, certificate for the new pet’s first physical examination at the Lipsey Clinic at the SPCA or another member clinic of the Niagara Frontier Veterinary Society, the option of a 30-day pet health insurance plan, and a free bag of Purina food (while supplies last).

Adoptions at the West Seneca shelter will open at 11 a.m. each day, and the final group of potential adopters will be allowed in the cat area (depending on number of people waiting) at 4 p.m. 

And don’t let the thought of being in close proximity to too many people during the pandemic spook you. To comply with COVID occupancy guidelines and to keep visitors safe, the SPCA will continue to limit the number of visitors in the cat adoption areas at all times. When the cat rooms are at maximum occupancy, visitors can wait outdoors, or in an overflow area at the SPCA. All visitors are required to wear masks or appropriate face coverings and are asked to comply with social distancing regulations. 

See our Bewitching Beauties here >>

See our Offsite Adoption Locations here >>

See our Halloween Pet Tips here >>

 

 

SPCA Treats Pet Owners to Tricks for Keeping Pets Safe This Halloween

October 22, 2020
By: SPCA Chief Communications Officer Gina Lattuca

WITH A FEW EXTRA PRECAUTIONS, PETS CAN HAVE A HAPPY HALLOWEEN TOO!

Halloween is meant to be fun for children of all ages, but according to the SPCA Serving Erie County, pets often experience the dark side of Halloween fun.  With extra precautions, seasonal problems can often be avoided:

-HUNGRY PETS:  CHOCOLATE CAN BE FATAL TO YOUR PET!  Please share this tip with children, who may be tempted to share their Halloween take with their best four-footed friends! The sweet smell of Halloween chocolate and other candy left by a door pleases pets, as do cookies and cakes served at Halloween parties. Sweets can cause diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain or worse.  Purchase Halloween treats made specifically for pets and keep the “people” treats away from where pets can reach them.

-PETS AS VICTIMS:  Halloween is traditionally known for trick-or-treaters…and pranksters.  KEEP ALL PETS INSIDE on Halloween night, and the nights immediately preceding and following October 31.  This will prevent them from being stolen, teased, kicked, blinded by flashlights or abused in other ways.

-NERVOUS/TERRITORIAL PETS:  Constant door-knocking or doorbell-ringing may cause an extremely nervous pet to shake or tremble uncontrollably, or have an “accident” in the house.  Territorial pets may become aggressive at the sound of unfamiliar visitors.  Keep nervous or territorial pets distracted in another room with the door closed.

-CURIOUS PETS:  Keep pets away from costume-making areas, where sequins or buttons can be swallowed.  Scissors used for cutting patterns, or knives used for carving jack o’lanterns, can harm your pet.  Also remember to keep pets away from a candle-illuminated jack o’lantern.  Halloween has become a popular season for decorations as well.  Keep decorations out of your pet’s reach, or securely attached in place to prevent your pet from pulling the decorations down.  Swallowing a decorative object may cause intestinal problems and present a potential emergency.

-KEEP CURRENT ID ON PETS: Exuberant or nervous pets may bolt out doors opened for trick-or-treat candy handouts. Ensure they are wearing proper identification (even if they are microchipped) in case they become lost. Collars are available for purchase at the SPCA Petique, located at the 300 Harlem Rd., West Seneca shelter, and other pet supply shops. If you lose or find a pet, visit the SPCA’s Lost & Found page for tips on what to do next.

Contact the SPCA Serving Erie County with any questions or concerns: 716-875-7360.

SPCA’s Scary-Good, Spine-Tingling Cat Sale >>