June 6, 2022 update, below: PUPPY MILL PIPELINE BILL PASSES IN NYS LEGISLATURE! See this story on WGRZ-TV >>

New York State Senate Passes “Stop the Puppy Mill Pipeline” Bill; Community Members Asked to Contact Assembly Members

July 22, 2020
By: SPCA Chief Communications Officer Gina Lattuca

UPDATE, June 6, 2022The “Stop the Puppy Mill Pipeline” bill passed in the New York State Legislature on June 3, 2022! The bill will now be placed in front of Governor Kathy Hochul to sign into law; if the bill becomes a law, third-party retailers, such as pet stores, will have one year to strategize acquisition of dogs, cats, and rabbits from animal shelters and rescues rather than from sources that could include barbaric puppy mill breeding industries. The SPCA Serving Erie County joins other state animal welfare organizations in thanking NYS Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie and NYS Assembly Member Linda B. Rosenthal for their efforts in furthering the Stop the Puppy Mill Pipeline bill.  Read the full story on PRNewswire.com >>


On Tuesday, July 21, the New York State Senate passed S.4234-A (Gianaris), the Stop the Puppy Mill Pipeline bill.

Now, the SPCA Serving Erie County joins the New York State Animal Protection Federation (NYSAPF) in asking members of the community to take action in encouraging the Assembly to pass this important piece of legislation.

The Stop the Puppy Mill Pipeline bill was one of the top legislative initiatives on the New York State Animal Protection Federation’s (NYSAPF) 2020 Humane Agenda.

From https://nysapf.org/legislation:
“Stop the Puppy Mill Pipeline (A6298-A Rosenthal/S4234-A Gianaris): This bill would stop the puppy mill pipeline into New York State. Instead of selling animals (puppies, kittens and rabbits) that come from breeding factories, pet stores would have the opportunity to rebrand as humane businesses and host shelter and rescue adoption events. In 2018, pet owners across the globe spent over $72.5 billion on their animals. It is estimated that only 2% of those sales are for puppies, kittens and rabbits from mills. It is time for New York to say no to these mills which are actual factories. In the case of puppies, female dogs are placed in cages day in and day out purely to breed. They are impregnated. They deliver. Within weeks, they’re impregnated again. When they are no longer “of use” to the puppy mill, they are usually euthanized.”

TAKE ACTION! 

Visit the NYSAPF Action Center to find an automated email form that you can send to your Assembly member urging him or her to bring A6298-A to the Assembly floor for a vote right here >> 

For more information on this and other NYSAPF legislative initiatives, visit the organization’s Legislation page here.

The information for this article was provided by the New York State Animal Protection Federation.

–Gina Lattuca, SPCA Chief Communications Officer

 

From the office of Erie County District Attorney John J. Flynn:


BRANT WOMAN ARRAIGNED ON 49 MISDEMEANOR COUNTS FOR FAILING TO PROPERLY CARE FOR CATS, DOGS, CHICKENS AND HORSES

May 13, 2022 — Erie County District Attorney John J. Flynn announces that 49-year-old Jesika S. Bristol-Glor of Town of Brant was arraigned yesterday evening before Brant Town Justice Jeffrey Gier on nine counts of Overdriving, Torturing and Injuring Animals; Failure to Provide Proper Sustenance and 40 counts of Failure to Provide Proper Food and Drink to Impounded Animal (misdemeanors under New York Agriculture and Markets Law).

The investigation began after the SPCA Serving Erie County received a report of animal neglect. It is alleged that on April 4, 2022, SPCA investigators conducted a welfare check of the animals at the defendant’s home on Brant Farnham Road in the Town of Brant and provided recommendations on how to improve upon care for the animals. It is further alleged that on April 20, 2022, SPCA investigators conducted a second welfare check and found that care for the animals had not improved. A search warrant was obtained for the property.

The defendant is accused of failing to provide necessary food, water and care to the animals confined to her property. It is alleged that on April 22, 2022, at approximately 10:00 a.m., investigators executed the search warrant and found three cats, eight dogs, three horses and 32 chickens living in unsanitary conditions without access to food and water. Nine of the chickens were severely emaciated. All of the animals were seized and remain in the custody of the SPCA.

Bristol-Glor is scheduled to return on Thursday, June 9, 2022 at 6:00 p.m. for further proceedings. She was released on her own recognizance as the charges are non-qualifying offenses for bail.  Judge Gier issued an order that prevents that defendant from owning any animals while the case is pending.

If convicted of all charges, Bristol-Glor faces a maximum sentence of one year in jail.  

Judge Gier issued an arrest warrant for the defendant’s husband who has also been charged in this case.

“I want the residents of Erie County to know that my office is committed to protecting the welfare of all animals. This defendant is accused of failing to provide food and water to more than 40 animals living on her property. Animal neglect is a crime. When you bring an animal into your home, you are responsible for their care. I want to thank our partners at the SPCA for their work in this investigation and the many services that they provide to help animals in our community,” said Erie County DA John Flynn

“The SPCA Serving Erie County works together with the community to ensure all animals are treated humanely, with respect, and that includes farm animals,” said SPCA President/CEO Cait Daly. “The fact that District Attorney Flynn and his team stand behind ending cruelty to animals of all types reminds us once again of why we are so proud to serve this county. This particular instance involved work and assistance from various organizations and individuals, and it’s inspiring to witness this community working together as a team, expressing zero tolerance for any form of animal cruelty.”

DA Flynn commends the SPCA Serving Erie County and SPCA Investigator Lindsey Wood for their work in this investigation.

The case is being prosecuted by Assistant District Attorney Christine M. Garvey of the Felony Trials Bureau and Assistant District Attorney Richard K. Barney, III of the Justice Courts Bureau.

As are all persons accused of a crime, the defendant is presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.


For more information, contact the Erie County District Attorney’s Office at (716) 858-2529.

–Gina Lattuca, SPCA Serving Erie County Chief Communications Officer

See this story on WGRZ-TV >>

See this story on WIVB-TV >>

See this story in The Observer >>

SPCA ACCEPTED INTO ‘WE FOSTER CHALLENGE!’

May 13, 2022
By: SPCA Vice President of Veterinary Services Melanie Rushforth

The SPCA Serving Erie County has been accepted into the Maddie’s Fund We Foster Challenge! 

The We Foster Challenge is meant to help shelter and rescue organizations create or expand community-based foster programs that will get community members involved and proudly saying, “We foster! So can you!” As we shift towards a more community-centric model of animal welfare, it’s important to get everyone in the Western NY area involved. After all, fostering is a job just about anyone can do.  Pet owners know the incredible bond that humans and animals have and the importance of keeping families together. Foster care is a powerful way to achieve that. That’s what the We Foster Challenge is all about!

SPIRIT is a Shadow Cat currently in a foster home. He’s made great progress in the home, and his foster mom Erica reports that he approaches her now when she holds a brush so he can take control of his own grooming.

Throughout the month of May, the SPCA Serving Erie County will be highlighting Shadow Cats as our We Foster Challenge project. Shadow Cats is a new initiative which works to meet shy or fearful cats where they are behaviorally to assist them in navigating the journey to becoming adoptable pets living out the rest of their lives in long-term homes.  We are seeing a positive response regarding the acceptance of these shy cats just the way they are, so we are expanding the adoption opportunities and housing of these cats to colony settings within the SPCA’s physical shelter as well.  While some Shadow Cats need to get out of the shelter to showcase their personalities, some are best kept with their buddies in the colony rooms that we have in our modern shelter.  We let the cats help us understand what they need.

SMOOCHIE was the first cat identified as a Shadow Cat. She is the “poster child” for the prestigious title, and serves as the spokeskitty! Her foster mom sent this photo and described the progress she is making in her home. Smoochie is still shy and prefers the shadows of her home, but she does come out to play, and follows foster mom around during meal time, and even approaches her for pets. Smoochie is available for adoption from foster mom’s home.

Shadow Cats are the best friend you don’t yet have.  They are quiet, stealth, and maybe just need a little extra time to acclimate into your home before they settle into being a lap cat.  Or perhaps they’ll remain the quiet and polite roommate that is grateful for your companionship and company….from a distance.  Shadow Cats offer the benefit of companionship without the burden of constant attention.  They’re great pets for individuals that work from home, or individuals who might work nontraditional shifts.  They’d be great roommates in apartments (they don’t need too much space!)

Pets are like people in so many ways, so why wouldn’t some of them be a little shyer than others?

This exciting Challenge is funded by Michelson Found Animals Foundation, Maddie’s Fund® and Cuddly in collaboration with Adopt-A-Pet.com, Adoptimize, American Pets Alive!, ASPCA, The Association for Animal Welfare Advancement, Best Friends Animal Society, Companions and Animals for Reform and Equity (CARE), Community Cats Podcast, Greater Good Charities, HeARTS Speak, Humane Society of the United States, National Animal Care and Control Association, Petco Love, and PetSmart Charities.  We are so grateful for the opportunity to be a part of this important shift in the work of animal welfare.

Want to get involved with fostering (or even adopting) your own Shadow Cat?  Please contact the SPCA Serving Erie County’s Foster Care Department via email at FosterCare@YourSPCA.org.

 

 

 

The SPCA’s New SHADOW CAT Initiative

February 10, 2022
By: Vice President of Veterinary Services Melanie Rushforth

UPDATE 4/21/22: The adoption fee for all Shadow Cats, regardless of age, has been waived! This includes the adoption of Shadow Cats from either the SPCA shelter or a foster home! Wondering if an adoptable kitty has been designated as a Shadow Cat? Check out adoptable animal photos here >>  and click on individual listings of our cute cats to read their descriptions and find out if they are Shadow Cats!

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The SPCA Serving Erie County is proud to roll out a new initiative that shines the spotlight on a unique population of animals in our care.   Effective immediately, the SPCA’s Shadow Cat effort will work to meet shy or fearful cats where they are behaviorally to assist them in navigating the journey to becoming adoptable pets living out the rest of their lives in long-term homes. 

Fear is common and a perfectly normal, innate, and adaptive behavior in all animals. However, if fear isn’t addressed appropriately, it can develop into serious behavioral and health problems and result in deterioration. Our goal with Shadow Cats is to be proactive in managing a cat’s fearfulness or shyness should a cat surrendered to the SPCA present those behaviors while in the shelter.

Transitions and big changes are hard for many cats, even ones who are not identified as fearful. In preparing to introduce a cat into the home regardless of their confidence level, it is very important to set the cat up for a successful experience by making some small, but important adjustments.  The intent of Shadow Cats is to offer a home environment, in the form of a foster home setting, to allow the cat to gain confidence, relax, and build trust.  These cats may wind up being the best friend that was missing in that particular home, and we always consider that a foster “win” rather than the traditional term “foster fail.” Even if the stay is temporary, the effects of a loving and welcoming home environment will be permanent. 

Introduction to a new home can be very challenging for a fearful cat. Fearful cats usually do best in relatively quiet homes or quiet areas of the home. Many fearful cats slowly become more confident as they get used to their living space and daily routine. The Foster Department of the SPCA Serving Erie County will assist new and experienced foster parents with whatever they may need to help  Shadow Cats acclimate to their homes.  Time, patience, love, and food are some of the ingredients that will help a Shadow Cat step into the light a little bit at a time. 

It is a special experience to build a relationship and bond with a fearful cat, and it is deeply rewarding. The journey may be long, but patience is a true gift to a nervous cat in need.  Just like people, cats can have vastly different personalities.  Some of these Shadow Cats may blossom into lap cats, while others may remain the quiet roommate that is grateful for love, attention (from a distance) and a safe place to call home.  Whatever the end result, we are grateful to have the opportunity to showcase these special cats in an effort to save more lives. 

Do you have room in your life for a Shadow Cat? Find out how you can get involved right here >>

 

Email MelanieR@yourspca.org for information or to register for the virtual session, or click on the image below for details on the SPCA’s Foster Care Department:

Ladies and gentlemen….drum roll, please!
The Spectrum News Buffalo
EVERYDAY HERO
for Thursday, December 17, 2020:

the SPCA’s own
CARY MUNSCHAUER!

Click on the image below to see this spotlight on a volunteer who dedicates her life to making our animals’ lives better! THANK YOU, CARY!

FREE ADOPTIONS TO CURRENT, PAST MEMBERS OF MILITARY DURING VETS & PETS, PRESENTED BY GEICO®

October 31, 2020
By: SPCA Chief Communications Officer Gina Lattuca

To celebrate the men and women of the armed services this Veterans Day, the SPCA Serving Erie County offers Vets & Pets, waiving adoption fees on most animals five months and older for individuals on active duty, reserves, and honorable discharge, along with service-disabled veterans and those retired from military service!

Vets & Pets begins Sunday, November 1 and runs through Veterans Day Wednesday, November 11 at the SPCA’s 300 Harlem Rd., West Seneca shelter and all SPCA offsite adoption locations. (Please note, the SPCA’s West Seneca shelter is closed Sunday, Nov. 1 and Sunday, Nov. 8, but many offsite adoption locations are open.)

Military ID or DD214 will need to be presented.

November 2020’s Vets & Pets program is proudly presented by GEICO®.

Contact SPCA Adoptions with any questions: 716-875-7360, ext. 233.

SEE ADOPTABLE ANIMALS >>
SEE OFFSITE ADOPTION LOCATIONS >>

SPCA SERVING ERIE COUNTY TO BRING BACK ‘NAME YOUR OWN PRICE’ ADOPTIONS FOR KITTENS & CATS 20 WEEKS AND OLDER

Starting Monday, August 19 for 19 days, the SPCA Serving Erie County will bring back its Name Your Own Price adoption special for kittens and cats ages 20 weeks and older. The adoption special will run through Friday, September 6 and applies to felines temporarily residing at the SPCA’s 300 Harlem Rd., West Seneca site, or one of several offsite adoption locations.

Included with the adoption is the cat’s spay/neuter surgery; age-appropriate vaccinations; initial worming; flea control medicine; feline leukemia test; microchip; temporary identification; a certificate for the new pet’s first physical examination at the SPCA’s Lipsey Clinic or at the Niagara Frontier Veterinary Society’s veterinarian of choice; the option of a 30-day pet health insurance plan provided by 24PetWatch; and while supplies last, a bag of Purina cat food.

See photos of cats available in West Seneca here, and for a list of offsite adoption locations along with photos of cats available at those sites, click here.  Questions about Name Your Own Price adoptions? Call SPCA Adoptions:  716-875-7360, ext. 233.

See the story on WKBW-TV >>

See the story on WYRK.com >>

See the story on WGRZ-TV >>

See the story on WBLK.com >>

See the story in Bee Publications >>

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