October’s Subaru Loves Pets Campaign at Northtown Will Benefit Animals at the SPCA Serving Erie County

October 3, 2022
By: SPCA Chief Communications Officer Gina Lattuca

Northtown Subaru in Amherst is celebrating Adopt-A-Shelter-Dog Month this October in a different way…in about 3,100 different ways, to be exact! Plus, they’re letting the cats join in the celebration.

For every dog or cat adopted at the SPCA Serving Erie County this October, Northtown Subaru will donate  $100 to the SPCA as part of the Subaru Loves Pets campaign! The donation will be made for up to 31 animals, one for each day of the month!

Subaru is a long-standing partner of a national animal cruelty prevention society, and since 2008 has helped to support more than 1500 adoption events that helped approximately 57,000 animal nationwide.

This year, Northtown Subaru, located at 3930 Sheridan Dr. in Amherst, will keep Subaru’s donation local, and by donating to the SPCA Serving Erie County, Northtown Subaru will be assisting homeless animals right here in our community.

“Partnering with the Northtown Subaru team is always an absolute pleasure and we are so grateful for their continued commitment in helping the animals in our community,” says SPCA Annual Giving Manager Phillip Weiss. “This promotion will not only help more animals get adopted but it will also earn more funds to help the animals who are in need of medical attention, food, shelter, and comfort when they have nowhere else to turn. Northtown Subaru is a true friend of animals and the SPCA Serving Erie County!”

See adoptable animals at the SPCA >>

 

 

New York State Legislature Joins Senate in Passing Stop the Puppy Mill Pipeline; Bill Now Awaits Signature from Governor Kathy Hochul

June 6, 2022
By: SPCA Chief Communications Officer Gina Lattuca

UPDATE, AUGUST 16 — The SPCA Serving Erie County asks for increased support from the community in urging Governor Kathy Hochul to sign the Stop the Puppy Mill Pipeline bill into law.

In a press release issued earlier this year by the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), New York State Director for the HSUS Brian Shapiro said, “New York’s remaining pet stores are joined at the hip with puppy mills. This long-overdue legislation seeks to protect our state’s consumers and companion animals from the scourge of puppy mill cruelty. We applaud [sponsoring legislators] for championing this game-changing bill and for their tireless work aimed at shutting down the horrible puppy mill-to-New York pipeline.”

Your voice matters. Urge Governor Hochul to sign the Stop the Puppy Mill Pipeline bill into law, and help stop puppy mills in New York State today!

Ask Gov. Hochul to stop NYS puppy mills >>



The “Stop the Puppy Mill Pipeline” bill passed in the New York State Legislature on June 3, 2022! 

The bill passed in the New York State Senate on July 21, 2020 (see full story below) and strengthened protection on May 10, 2022 (info here >> ).

That means it will now be placed in front of Governor Kathy Hochul to sign into law.

If the Stop the Puppy Mill Pipeline bill becomes a law, third-party retailers, such as pet stores, will have one year to strategize acquisition of dogs, cats, and rabbits from animal shelters and rescues rather than from sources that could include barbaric puppy mill breeding industries. The SPCA Serving Erie County joins other state animal welfare organizations in thanking NYS Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie and NYS Assembly Member Linda B. Rosenthal for their efforts in furthering the Stop the Puppy Mill Pipeline bill.  Read the full story on PRNewswire.com >>

See this story on WGRZ-TV >>


New York State Senate Passes “Stop the Puppy Mill Pipeline” Bill; Community Members Asked to Contact Assembly Members

July 22, 2020
By: SPCA Chief Communications Officer Gina Lattuca

On Tuesday, July 21, the New York State Senate passed S.4234-A (Gianaris), the Stop the Puppy Mill Pipeline bill.

Now, the SPCA Serving Erie County joins the New York State Animal Protection Federation (NYSAPF) in asking members of the community to take action in encouraging the Assembly to pass this important piece of legislation.

The Stop the Puppy Mill Pipeline bill was one of the top legislative initiatives on the New York State Animal Protection Federation’s (NYSAPF) 2020 Humane Agenda.

From https://nysapf.org/legislation:
“Stop the Puppy Mill Pipeline (A6298-A Rosenthal/S4234-A Gianaris): This bill would stop the puppy mill pipeline into New York State. Instead of selling animals (puppies, kittens and rabbits) that come from breeding factories, pet stores would have the opportunity to rebrand as humane businesses and host shelter and rescue adoption events. In 2018, pet owners across the globe spent over $72.5 billion on their animals. It is estimated that only 2% of those sales are for puppies, kittens and rabbits from mills. It is time for New York to say no to these mills which are actual factories. In the case of puppies, female dogs are placed in cages day in and day out purely to breed. They are impregnated. They deliver. Within weeks, they’re impregnated again. When they are no longer “of use” to the puppy mill, they are usually euthanized.”

More information on the passing of this bill >>

Visit the NYSAPF Action Center to find an automated email form that you can send to your Assembly member urging him or her to bring A6298-A to the Assembly floor for a vote right here >> 

For more information on this and other NYSAPF legislative initiatives, visit the organization’s Legislation page here.

The information for this article was provided by the New York State Animal Protection Federation.

 

 

Click on the image below to watch the full story:



–Gina Lattuca, SPCA Chief Communications Officer

FOURTH OF JULY, OUTDOOR FESTIVALS: No Picnic for Pets

June 29, 2022
By: SPCA Chief Communications Officer Gina Lattuca

The days immediately following July 4 can result in increased numbers of stray animals admitted to animal control facilities and humane societies, and often the explosive sound of fireworks is to blame. Fireworks cause many pets to panic, resulting in extreme and sometimes dangerous escape measures from homes or yards. Without identification, it is nearly impossible to reunite pet with owner.  Please keep the following tips in mind this holiday:

* ENSURE ALL ANIMALS ARE WEARING CURRENT IDENTIFICATION! Even if the animal has microchip identification, place a collar with an ID tag on your pet. If a neighbor finds your animal, an ID collar that includes your phone number can lead to a faster reunion.

* DON’T TAKE ANIMALS TO FIREWORKS DISPLAYS. The sounds and sights of fireworks often have the ability to turn the most calm, quiet, and non-aggressive pet into a stressed, frightened animal. A startled animal may not only break free and run away, but may also bite. If you bring your dog to these events and realize it’s becoming too overwhelming for him or her, DO NOT KEEP YOUR DOG IN YOUR CAR FOR ANY AMOUNT OF TIME! The effects of heatstroke on even slightly warm days begin within mere minutes. and the results could be fatal.  Stressed animals confined to cars can not only die or suffer severe brain damage, but can also experience an overwhelming stress level that can cause physical harm to the pet, and/or damage to the vehicle’s interior. Home is the safest place for pets this holiday.

* HAVE SOMEONE HOME WITH NERVOUS PETS DURING FIREWORKS. If the animal is with someone he or she knows, the pet’s stress level will be greatly reduced. Keep the volume on a television or radio turned up to block some of the noise. ThunderShirts®  reportedly work to calm the anxiety felt by some dogs and cats when they can hear fireworks, thunder, even when they experience separation anxiety, and can be found in many local pet supply shops and online. Other anti-anxiety items are carried here in the SPCA’s Petique: (716) 875-7360, ext. 237.

New! * NOISE-CANCELLING HEADPHONES FOR HOUNDS. This tip comes from the SPCA’s own Annual Giving Manager, Phil. He and his wife, Samantha, have a beautiful dog, Daenerys, who is very afraid of fireworks. Phil says, “We’ve tried everything to keep her calm, from vests to CBD, and nothing seems to work.” Phil and Samantha ordered custom-made noise-cancelling headphones especially for dogs. The headphones, which must be ordered in advance based on each dog’s specific measurements, contain Bluetooth technology which allows owners to stream their dogs’ most calming musical selections (decibal reduction for the dogs provide a “whisper volume”) directly into their ears. Here, Daenerys is pictured sporting her new headphones, which arrived only days before July 4. We’ll keep you posted on Daenerys’ review of this new calming approach! A simple online search will direct pet owners to the various companies offering these headphones.

If a pet manages to escape, community members can visit the SPCA’s Lost & Found/Stray Animals page at YourSPCA.org, which includes effective ways to find a lost pet. A link to local animal control facilities can also be found on that page.


 Home is also the safest place for pets on extremely hot days, during arts festivals, food festivals, and other crowded outdoor events.  Very hot weather paired with immense crowds of people and loud, strange noises heighten the stress level for many animals.  Your pet’s body is closer to the asphalt and can heat up quickly. The hot pavement can also burn unprotected, sensitive paw pads

See the SPCA’s additional, important reminders for keeping pets safe in the summer heat here >>

If you witness animal cruelty or see any animal in need of rescue or emergency assistance this summer, the SPCA Serving Erie County may be able to help. Please call the SPCA Monday through Sunday,
8 a.m. – 6:45 p.m., at (716) 875-7360, ext. 214.

See this story on WKBW-TV >>

See this story on WIVB-TV >>

Click on the image below to read the full article and to see an interview with our own President/CEO Cait Daly!

(STAY TUNED! More on the SPCA’s involvement with HASS coming soon! You won’t want to miss it!)

Current SPCA Job Openings >>

 

–Gina Lattuca, SPCA Chief Communications Officer

Click on the image below to see the full story of SPCA Officer Jen Maleskis’ dramatic snake tale!

— Gina Lattuca, SPCA Chief Communications Officer


May 16, 2022

 

Dear SPCA Friends & Family:

On Saturday morning May 14, members of our SPCA’s Humane Education Department embarked on a visit to Buffalo Public School #99, the Stanley M. Makowski Early Childhood Center, 1095 Jefferson Ave. in Buffalo. We were participants in an event teaching children about the different ways to safely express themselves and their feelings through art, words, music, and more.

Mere hours later, less than one mile away, ten lives were taken in a barbaric act of violence, rage, and racism.

The people we lost to this hatred, members of our community, were exceptional individuals who, we have learned, truly made the world a better place for those in their lives and for so many they didn’t even know. Our hearts go out to the victims, to their families, to all the people in our towns and cities and counties who are suffering from this hateful brutality.

The violence inflicted upon these individuals, and the violence that affects community members every single day in our neighborhoods, is something we must continue to fight together. With one voice. As one community.

The SPCA Serving Erie County stands committed to its work of putting an end to such violence. Our specific efforts in response to this weekend’s killings are slowly unfolding, but we are ready to bring our existing programs where they are needed most. Our Paws for Love therapy pet visitation teams are on notice, ready to step in at counseling events, therapy sessions, stress-relief events, and more to help suffering individuals cope with their feelings, fears, and emotions. Our Humane Education team is ready to bring our important message of anti-violence, inclusion, empathy, respect, compassion, and love to our community’s children. Our pet food pantry is already in the process of delivering pet food and litter to neighborhoods filled with pet owners who may have difficulty acquiring these items at this time.

We are certain there will be more opportunities for our humane society to assist in efforts designed to not only help with what happened this weekend, but to fill the needs that arise in Erie County every day.

Our SPCA has and will remain diligent in its contribution to the creation of a society more humane, more inclusive, more accepting, and more loving. This can only be accomplished when our entire community works together in solidarity against acts of bigotry, racism, hatred, and violence.

As always, we remain honored to serve the people of Erie County and beyond.

Committed to Kindness,


Cait Daly
President & CEO
SPCA Serving Erie County
CaitD@yourspca.org

–Gina Lattuca, SPCA Chief Communications Officer

SPCA Serving Erie County Assists BISSELL Pet Foundation in Air Transport of 150 Animals to Buffalo

April 21, 2022
By: Chief Communications Officer Gina Lattuca

More than 150 animals will take to the skies the morning of Saturday, April 23 as the BISSELL Pet Foundation, assisted by the SPCA Serving Erie County, engages in a major animal transport to Buffalo.

The dogs and cats will arrive by air from Baton Rouge, LA to Buffalo, NY in “…an effort to relieve overcrowded shelters due to seasonal high intake, short-staffing, a shortage of shelter veterinarians, and slowing adoptions for larger dogs,” according to the BISSELL Pet Foundation in a recent press release.

The press release stated, “This lifesaving flight has been organized and made possible through BISSELL Pet Foundation. Our trusted partner, the SPCA Serving Erie County in Buffalo, NY, will be leading the ground team for unloading and distribution to other shelter partners.”

Fifteen of the transported dogs will stay at the SPCA Serving Erie County, and the other animals will be divided between eight other animal shelters in NY, OH, PA, even Toronto and Windsor, Canada.

The SPCA Serving Erie County’s Annual Giving Manager, Phillip Weiss, will depart for Louisiana from Buffalo Friday, April 22 and will return with the animals Saturday. The flight is scheduled to arrive in Buffalo between 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. at TAC-Air BUF, 50 North Airport Dr. in Cheektowaga.

“This will be such an exciting experience and I am very blessed to be a part of it,” Weiss says. “I can’t wait to represent the SPCA Serving Erie County and our region during this transport, and most importantly, help get these precious animals to Buffalo safely. These animals are coming from unfavorable situations and from shelters that do not have the resources and staffing to provide the care needed; they’ll now receive that care from us and the other receiving shelters. We are very fortunate to have such generous communities in our region that help us provide for these high-risk animals. Thank you to the Bissell Pet Foundation for making a huge difference in the lives of so many animals! ”

SPCA President/CEO Cait Daly couldn’t agree with Phil more. “We are honored to be working with the Bissell Foundation on this transport that will save the lives of these precious animals. We are incredibly grateful to our community for stepping up to foster, adopt, and donate. We could never do what we do without that support!”

“Transport is a lifeline to at-risk adoptable pets as shelters throughout the nation struggle with overcrowding,” said Cathy Bissell of BISSELL Pet Foundation. “BISSELL Pet Foundation is incredibly grateful for our shelter and rescue partners who have opened their doors to give these deserving pets a second chance.”

Photos and videos of the transport will be shared on the SPCA’s Facebook page >>  and other platforms. When the transported animals are available for adoption they will be listed, along with all other available animals, on the Adoptable Animals page of YourSPCA.org >>

 

A few behind-the-scenes photos sent by Phil on Friday afternoon:

LILIES, CHOCOLATE HARMFUL TO PETS; OTHER EASTER PET SAFETY REMINDERS

April 5, 2022
By: Gina Lattuca, SPCA Chief Communications Officer

The SPCA Serving Erie County reminds pet owners that chocolate and Easter lilies can be harmful, even deadly, to pets.

All parts of the Easter lily, day lily, tiger lily, rubrum lily, and others are toxic to felines. Ingesting even a small amount of the plant can result in kidney failure and, if untreated, death. Shortly after ingestion, a cat may vomit, become lethargic, or develop a lack of appetite. As the kidney damage progresses, these signs worsen. In most cases, a cat must be treated within mere hours of ingesting the plant, or damage to the kidneys will be irreversible.

Most chocolate contains high amounts of fat and methylxanthine alkaloids (theobromine and caffeine) that cause constriction of arteries, increased heart rate, and central nervous system/cardiac muscle stimulation.

These effects can lead to vomiting, diarrhea, restlessness, excessive panting and thirst, hyperactivity, increased urinating, stiffness, and exaggerated reflexes. Cardiac failure, seizures, coma, and death can result if the chocolate ingestion is not found within four to six hours and treated appropriately.

Other reminders:

*Thinking about bringing a bunny into the home? Check out this important article from the SPCA’s former Rabbit Coordinator Mark Schnerle and the House Rabbit Society. You’ll see the truth about the nine most common bunny myths, you’ll learn how to select the right rabbit for you and your family, and more!

*If you color your Easter eggs, ensure the food colorings or dyes do not contain ingredients that are toxic to pets. And speaking of eggs, why risk salmonella by including raw eggs in your pets’ diet? Cooked eggs will offer them the same nutritional benefit.

*Check candy for the ingredient XYLITOL, extremely toxic to dogs even in very small amounts. Xylitol is a low-calorie sugar alcohol used as a sweetener, and does not raise human blood sugar levels or damage teeth. However, it’s extremely toxic to dogs and can cause liver failure, seizures, and death.

*Keep Easter basket ‘grass’ and foil candy wrappers away from pets. These items are non-digestible and can get caught in the intestines, leading to blockage and possible perforation. They can lead to choking, strangulation, and even worse, an internal obstruction.

*If you’re using garlic, onions, or chives in meal preparation, be extra careful about ensuring your pets aren’t sneaking a taste. These items are toxic to both cats and dogs and can cause gastroenteritis and hemolytic anemia. Adding to the risk is the fact that signs of both may not appear for several days. Signs of toxicity include increased heart/breathing rates, pale gums, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, and lethargy.

*Tempted to share holiday table scraps with Fido or Fluffy? Use discretion. Be aware of bones in the mix. And don’t overfeed your animal with table food to which he’s not accustomed…diarrhea is never a pleasant thing with which to deal, especially on a holiday.

*Be careful in selecting spring plants for the home. The foliage, flower, or pod of daffodils can cause upset tummies, vomiting, or diarrhea; flower heads of hydrangeas can cause stomach pains, vomiting, and weakness; the seeds and pods of wisteria can cause all of the above plus dehydration and collapse; even ivy is toxic and can cause breathing difficulty, coma, or death.

*Be sure curious pets are not able to get at a garbage bag! Even if harmful items are properly disposed of, an unsupervised pet can chew through a plastic garbage bag and still have access to raw bones and other waste.

Contact your veterinarian for more information.  In an after-hours or holiday veterinary emergency, you can reach an emergency veterinary clinic at 716-839-4043 in Cheektowaga, or 716-662-6660 in Orchard Park.

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