SPCA Issues Hot Weather Reminders Designed to Keep Pets Safe

June 25, 2019
By: SPCA Chief Communications Officer Gina Lattuca

UPDATE, July 1, 2019: From WGRZ-TV, 6/29/19 – Tonawanda Law Bans Dogs At City Events, Cites Canine Safety.

HEATSTROKE CAN KILL, AND FAST. Most pet owners realize that keeping pets in hot cars can kill them…but not many realize just how quickly the effects of heatstroke can set in for a dog or cat. Heatstroke is a condition animals begin to suffer gradually, but it accelerates quickly; it’s easy for early signs of heatstroke to go unrecognized, and for the pet to be in an emergency situation within mere minutes.

On warm days, a vehicle acts like an oven.  It holds the heat inside, and that heat becomes very intense even on days that don’t seem too warm. On an 85-degree day, for example, even with the windows open, the temperature inside a car can climb to 102 degrees in 10 minutes, and to 120 degrees in 30 minutes.  With the humidity we experience here in Buffalo, it may go even higher.  Because a dog’s normal body temperature is 101-102.5 degrees Fahrenheit, he can withstand a body temperature of 107-108 degrees for only a very short time before suffering irreparable brain damage…or death.

The typical signs of heatstroke are:
– Panting
– High body temperature
– Dehydration
– Red mouth/eye membranes
– Rapid, irregular heart rate
– Diarrhea
– Weakness, looking dazed
– Coma

If your pet begins exhibiting any of these signs, contact a veterinarian immediately.

Here’s what New York State residents can do if a pet is seen in a hot vehicle.

Also, use caution during warm weather months when leaving animals outside in yards or on porches. Never leave them outside extended periods of time. Ensure appropriate shade and water are always available. Keep close supervision on your pet when outdoors on hot, humid, sunny summer days. If you see an animal left on a porch or in a yard with no access to shelter, or with inadequate shelter, the SPCA may be able to intervene in accordance with New York State’s Animal Shelter Law.  Contact the SPCA immediately if the location is within Erie County: (716) 875-7360. In after-hours emergencies, call the SPCA at (716) 449-0363. Read more about the Animal Shelter Law here.

ADMINISTER FLEA PREVENTION PRODUCTS CORRECTLY! Early last June, the SPCA received two cats on death’s door after cheap, incorrect flea products purchased from deep discount stores were applied. The SPCA has already received several phone calls this season from people who misapplied flea products to their pets.   DO NOT APPLY PRODUCTS MEANT FOR DOGS ON CATS, AND DO NOT APPLY CAT FLEA PRODUCTS TO DOGS, AND FOLLOW DIRECTIONS CONCERNING THE VOLUME AND MANNER OF APPLICATION!  Read the directions carefully PRIOR to application, not during application. The application of improper flea products, low-quality flea products, or products applied incorrectly, can cause internal damage or death to your pet. Always consult a veterinarian before purchasing and applying flea products.

Flea products are not the only items that shouldn’t be purchased at deep discount stores. Some pet toys are not durable enough to withstand a pet’s play. This tip and photo came to us this summer from Patrick in South Dayton, NY. Patrick purchased a disc dog toy from a deep discount store for his dogs Roscoe and Titan. On the first throw, Titan caught the toy, which shattered, said Patrick, “…like a mirror.” (See photo, below.) Be sure the toys you purchase for your pets are safe and sturdy.

KEEP PETS HOME DURING OUTDOOR FESTIVALS. Art festivals, food festivals, summer fireworks displays, and other crowded outdoor events are no places for dogs.  Extremely hot weather, paired with immense crowds of people and strange noises and scents, heightens the stress level for many animals; the repetitive, exploding sound of fireworks is enough to make even the calmest animal frantic and sometimes aggressive. Your pet’s body is closer to the asphalt and can heat up much more quickly.

The hot pavement can also burn unprotected, sensitive paw pads when dogs are on pavement for any period of time. Check out this photo from a June, 2019 post on WGRZ-TV and click on the photo for the full story:

DON’T FORCE EXERCISE, primarily after a meal or in hot, humid weather. Instead, exercise pets in the cool of the early morning or evening. Be extra-sensitive to older and overweight animals, or those prone to heart or respiratory problems. Bring an ample supply of water along on the walk. For cool, indoor walks, bring pets to shop at the SPCA’s Petique or other pet-friendly stores.

BE CAREFUL WHERE YOU WALK! Avoid walking your dog in areas that you suspect have been sprayed with insecticides or other chemicals, or have puddles or spots of auto coolant. The sweet taste of poisonous liquids attracts animals and can sicken or kill them if ingested. Clean any spills immediately or consider using animal-friendly products to help minimize risks.

WATCH WHAT THEY EAT & DRINK! In July of 2012, two family dogs in North Buffalo died after eating poisonous mushrooms (amanita) growing right in the backyard. Check yards and any areas pets frequent. If something looks suspicious, don’t take a chance….GET RID OF IT. Leptospirosis is a bacterial infection spread through the urine of contaminated animals. The bacteria can get into water (puddles, ponds, pools, etc.) or soil and survive there for months. Humans AND animals can be infected. Use caution when letting your pet drink, walk through, or swim in water that may have been exposed to infected animals (rodents, wildlife, infected domestic animals, and others).

KEEP YOUR PET WELL-GROOMED AND CLEAN to combat summer skin problems. If your dog’s coat is appropriate, cutting his hair to a one-inch length will help prevent overheating and will also allow you to watch for fleas and ticks. Don’t shave down to the skin, though; your pet can get sunburned (see below)! A cat should be brushed frequently to keep a tangle-free coat. Long-haired cats will be more comfortable with a stylish, summer clip.

KEEPS PETS SAFE WHILE OUTSIDE. Cats should be kept indoors at all times of the year and never allowed to roam loose, unprotected and unsupervised.  If dogs are allowed outside for an extended period of time, ensure there is proper shade and fresh water available at all times.  During the hottest and most humid parts of the day, bring dogs in the house. Keep identification on all animals at all times. And remember…pets can get sunburned too. Speak with your veterinarian about applying sunblock to your pet’s sun-sensitive areas, such as nose and ears.

USE CAUTION WHEN MAKING SUMMER PURCHASES! When purchasing lawn and garden products, always read the labels for ingredients toxic to dogs, cats, and other animals. Fertilizers, weed killers, herbicides, pesticides, and other chemicals can be fatal to your pets. “Weed out” the toxic products from your garage, and learn more about non-toxic, pet-friendly seasonal items. Snail, slug, and rat/mouse baits, and ant/roach baits and traps are also hazardous. Metaldehyde, one of the poisonous ingredients in many baits, is often very appealing to pets, and metaldehyde poisoning can cause increased heart rate, breathing complications, seizures, liver complications, and death. If insect and nuisance animal control items must be purchased, keep them in locations impossible for pets to reach.

KEEP CORN COBS AWAY FROM DOGS! In August of 2013, SPCA veterinarians removed corn cobs from the intestines of not one but TWO dogs! Both survived, but without veterinary treatment the results could have been fatal. Read this article from VetsNow.com  discussing the dangers of corn cobs and corn to dogs.

DO NOT USE HUMAN INSECT REPELLENTS ON PETS! These items are toxic when ingested at high doses, and dogs and cats may lick it off and ingest it, potentially resulting in a toxicity. Read more about what you can use here.

BUNNIES NEED TO KEEP COOL TOO! Pet rabbits who live indoors with no air conditioning can benefit from an easy cooling technique. Rabbit owners can freeze a filled water bottle. Once the water bottle is frozen, it can be wrapped in a cloth and placed on the rabbit’s cage floor. If the rabbit becomes too warm, she’ll instinctively know to lie next to the bottle. Fans can also be pointed in the general direction of a rabbit cage, and rabbits will raise their ears (their natural cooling system) to catch the breeze and cool off. On hot days, pet owners with rabbits living in outdoor pens will want to ensure their pets are cool enough in outdoor locations; if not, rabbits and pens should come indoors.

If you witness animal cruelty or see any animal in need of rescue or emergency assistance this summer, the SPCA Serving Erie County may be able to help. Please call the following numbers depending on the day and time:
Monday – Saturday, 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.: 716-875-7360
Monday – Saturday, 4 p.m. – midnight: 716-449-0363
Sunday, 8 a.m. – midnight: 716-449-0363

Between midnight and 8 a.m., please contact your local animal control, police department, or call your local after-hours emergency clinic for prices and services.

_________________________________________

Those who witness a situation that might constitute
cruelty and/or violence toward animals in Erie County,
including animals left outdoors with inappropriate
shelter in yards or on porches, are encouraged to report the
circumstances to the SPCA Serving Erie County:
716-875-7360 or cruelty@yourspca.org.

SPCA LAUNCHES ‘TALE FOR TWO’ SUMMER READING CHALLENGE SCHEDULE; PROGRAM ENCOURAGES CHILDREN TO READ TO SHELTER PETS

May 28, 2019
By: SPCA Chief Communications Officer Gina Lattuca


(6/10/19: Tale for Two summer orientation dates have passed, but you can register children any time for the challenge! Just contact Humane Education Director Christine Davis: HumaneEducation@yourspca.org.)

The SPCA Serving Erie County will present its first annual Tale for Two Summer Reading Challenge this year, with prizes for children who read multiple books!

Tale For Two encourages children ages 6 – 15 to read aloud to adoptable animals at the SPCA. Animals benefit from the increased socialization and reduced stress levels, while children work on their literacy and reading skills, building their self-esteem and confidence.

This summer’s reading challenge sessions, available in groups of 6 (program cost $40) or 12 (program cost $70), are available on Tuesdays, June 18 – September 3, 5 p.m. – 8 p.m. at the SPCA’s 300 Harlem Rd., West Seneca shelter. Reading sessions are 30 minutes in length.

Children in kindergarten through fifth grade who read three books will receive a certificate of achievement, an SPCA pencil, and a wristband; five books earn the certificate, pencil, and humane-themed book; seven books earn the certificate, book, and an SPCA
T-shirt.

Children in grades six through 11 who read two books receive the certificate, pencil, and wristband; three books earn the certificate, book, and T-shirt; and five books earn the certificate, book, and an SPCA sweatshirt.

Children can bring their own reading materials, or make a selection from the SPCA’s library.

Readers and parents/guardians are required to attend one hour-long orientation session at the SPCA either Thursday, May 30,
5 p.m. or Saturday,
June
8, 3 p.m. (Please see below for information on how to register children for the challenge after June 8.)

Register for the Tale for Two Summer Reading Challenge and one orientation session right here >> (orientation dates have passed, but you can still register children for the challenge! Just contact Humane Education Director Christine Davis: HumaneEducation@yourspca.org.)

 

Please contact SPCA Humane Education Director Christine Davis with questions: HumaneEducation@yourspca.org.

See additional Tale for Two photos here >>

See the story on WKBW-TV’s website >>