Updated May 13, 2020,  6:45 a.m.

 

ON THIS PAGE:

-Status of the SPCA Serving Erie County’s programs and services during its COVID-19 Response period;

-Tips for pets at home and information on creating a pet disaster preparedness kit;

-The most current information available to us concerning COVID-19 and companion animals;

-List of cancelled SPCA events and programs.

This page will be regularly updated with the most current developments at the SPCA Serving Erie County. Please check back frequently. Thank you.





On March 20, New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo named “Animal Shelters” to the list of essential businesses in NYS.  In an effort to protect community members, patrons, volunteers, and staff members, the SPCA Serving Erie County is modifying its services in the following manner. Please check back frequently as this information is rapidly changing:

ANIMAL ADOPTIONS:
-Adoptions will be BY APPOINTMENT ONLY Monday through Saturday. 
Adoptions are open 10 a.m.-4 p.m., and appointments will be made until approximately 3 p.m.
-In accordance with New York State regulations of 8 p.m. 4/17, anyone with an appointment must come to the SPCA wearing a mask or appropriate face shield.
-If you are interested in adopting an animal at the SPCA Serving Erie County, please call 716-875-7360, ext. 207 to schedule an appointment to visit the animals.
-At this time, the only people who will be allowed in SPCA adoption areas are those people with appointments and wearing masks. Please note that we are offering a limited number of appointments each day to reduce the number of people in our building at one time, in accordance with Erie County occupancy guidelines. Thank you for your understanding.

ANIMAL ADMISSIONS:
-The SPCA will be admitting sick or injured animals ONLY at this time. The only exceptions to this are animals already owned by the SPCA residing in volunteer foster homes (200+ animals) who will slowly and safely be brought back into the shelter and placed for adoption.
-Sick or injured animals will be admitted to the SPCA BY APPOINTMENT ONLY.
-If you are calling Monday through Saturday, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., please call 716-875-7360, press 0, and ask for the Admissions Department. If you are calling Monday through Saturday, 4 p.m.-8 p.m., please call 716-449-0363.
-In accordance with New York State regulations of 8 p.m. 4/17, anyone with an appointment must come to the SPCA wearing a mask or appropriate face shield.
-At this time we are unable to assist after 8 p.m., however, there are emergency animal clinics in Erie County with systems in place to assist you after 8 p.m.
-For more information on how to proceed with either owned or outdoor cats who have kittens, please visit our #bestwithmom page.

ANIMAL EMERGENCIES, ANIMAL RESCUE, & ANIMAL CRUELTY INVESTIGATIONS
-If you are experiencing an emergency with your animal or find that an animal is in an emergency situation, please call the SPCA Monday through Friday at 716-875-7360, ext. 214, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. During the hours of 4 p.m.-8 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays 8 a.m.-8 p.m., please call 716-449-0363.
-When you call, please advise the dispatcher if you or any members of your household are experiencing flu-like symptoms. This information will ensure first responders can prepare to prevent the spread of any illnesses.
-At this time we are unable to assist after 8 p.m., however, there are emergency animal clinics in Erie County with systems in place to assist you after 8 p.m.

DONATIONS:
-Those wishing to make financial donations are encouraged to do so online, by phone at 716-875-7360 ext. 227, or through the mail at SPCA Serving Erie County, 300 Harlem Rd., West Seneca, NY 14224.
-The SPCA will absolutely need donations of towels, sheets, blankets, newspapers, etc. at a later time. If you have items to be donated, we cannot accept them at this time  but we’d love it if you could  please hold them for our animals! Details >>
-Due to staffing restrictions at this time, most donation receipting is on hold.  We ask for your patience as receipts may be delayed by a few weeks.

EDUCATIONAL FARM:
Closed to the general public.
-If you have a sick or injured farm animal you are surrendering to the SPCA Serving Erie County, please follow the Animal Admissions guidelines above. Only sick or injured animals can be admitted at this time.
-If you are ill and have a sick or injured farm animal to surrender, please follow the Animal Admissions guidelines above to schedule an appointment for possible pick-up.
-Adoptions are BY APPOINTMENT ONLY.
-Those interested in adopting farm animals or fowl should call 716-875-7360 ext. 212 or 215 to make an appointment to meet the animals.
-Find information on equine care during the COVID-19 pandemic here >>

END-OF-LIFE SERVICES:
-If you have made that difficult decision for your pet, the SPCA is still able to help with euthanasia services at this time BY APPOINTMENT.
-If you are calling Monday through Saturday, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., please call 716-875-7360, press 0, and ask for the Admissions Department to make your appointment. If you are in an emergency euthanasia situation and are calling Monday through Saturday, 4 p.m.-8 p.m., please call 716-449-0363.
-Information on pet euthanasia  is available here >>  

FIELD TRIPS, TOURS, OTHER GROUP VISITS:
Currently-scheduled visits have been cancelled.

HUMANE EDUCATION
See programs currently offered virtually, including book-reading and crafts, on our virtual video playlist >> (coming soon)

HUMANE POSTER & CREATIVE WRITING CONTEST:
Extended. New deadline for submissions: August 31, 2020. Children’s pieces can now be submitted digitally. For all revisions to this contest, please visit http://YourSPCA.org/RevisedContest .

LIPSEY CLINIC
CLOSED
– no new appointments will be made at this time.

PETIQUE
Closed to the general public.

SUMMER CAMP
No new registrations at this time.
Summer Camp is not cancelled at this time. Any status changes will be announced.

TRANSPORTS
At this time, the SPCA Serving Erie County will not be receiving animal transports from out-of-town to limit potential risk of disease spread.

VOLUNTEERS
There will be no new volunteer orientations at this time. All youth volunteer attendance is postponed. There will be no new Paws for Love volunteer evaluations or orientations until later this year. If you are a current volunteer, please check with your team’s coordinator for further instructions…and thank you for everything you’re doing to stay informed while you’re continuing to help our animals.

WILDLIFE
-The Wildlife Department will be responding to animal emergencies.
-Anyone with a wild animal emergency should CALL BEFORE TOUCHING THE ANIMAL(s) OR BRINGING THE ANIMAL(s) IN!
Monday-Sunday
8 a.m.-6 p.m. please call 716-449-0727.
6 p.m.-8 p.m. please call 716-449-0363.
8 p.m.-8 a.m. we are closed.
-In accordance with New York State regulations of 8 p.m. 4/17, anyone with an appointment to bring an animal to the SPCA must come to the shelter wearing a mask or appropriate face shield.
-For more information on how to proceed with baby bunnies or squirrels you may find outdoors,  please visit our #bestwithmom page.

At this time, other departments will operate in limited capacities. Again, this information is rapidly changing.



Can you assist ill family members or friends by caring for the household pet(s) if someone becomes ill? If so, click on the images below for full-sized infographics to share, courtesy of Animalsheltering.org:


Pertaining to pets in homes, Animalsheltering.org recommends pet owners take the following simple steps to ensure preparedness in case of illness:

– Identify a family member or friend who can care for pets if someone in the household becomes ill;

– Have crates, food, and extra supplies on hand for quick movement of pets should it become necessary;

– All animal vaccines should be up-to-date in the event boarding becomes necessary;

– Ensure all medications are documented with dosages, administering directions, and if possible, your veterinarian’s prescription;

– Ensure pets are wearing identification (collar & ID tag) or are microchipped.

The SPCA also reminds you to eliminate any contact with your pet if you are exhibiting signs of illness.

-Find a list of recommendations for SPCA Officer Tyler Robertson’s  PET DISASTER PREPAREDNESS KIT here >>

-Find SPCA Serving Erie County recommendations for properly caring for your pets during this COVID-19 Response period here >>

-Find information on equine care during the COVID-19 pandemic here >>

-For more information on your pets and COVID-19, please speak with your veterinarian.


Updated April 27, 7:05 a.m.
The Centers for Disease Control and Protection (CDC) state in a recent document concerning COVID-19’s transmission between humans and animals, “CDC is aware of a small number of pets, including dogs and cats, to be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, mostly after close contact with people with COVID-19. Only a few of the animals reported to be positive showed signs of illness.” Read that entire document from the CDC here.

Updated April 24, 5:09 p.m.
Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association DVM states ““It is critically important that pet owners keep these few positive cat cases in perspective and not make rash decisions about their pets. At this time there is no reason to think that pets can spread COVID-19 to humans. It is likely that the pets were infected by people with COVID-19. We do know that our pets provide very important and positive roles in our lives.” Read the full HSVMA document
here >>

Updated April 24, 9:17 a.m.
The American Veterinary Medical Association has released a statement regarding the confirmation of COVID in two New York State cats. Read that statement and find more information on testing pets here.

Updated April 22, 4:14 p.m.
The USDA has released a document regarding the confirmation of COVID in two cats residing in separate parts of New York State. Included in this document is the following statement: “Public health officials are still learning about SARS-CoV-2, but there is no evidence that pets play a role in spreading the virus in the United States. Therefore, there is no justification in taking measures against companion animals that may compromise their welfare. Further studies are needed to understand if and how different animals, including pets, could be affected.” Read the full USDA document here.

Updated April 15, 11:30 a.m.
The American Veterinary Medical Association has released information from the National Dog Bite Prevention Coalition offering tips for safely sheltering at home with pets during the COVID crisis. See that document here.

Updated April 6, 10:27 a.m.

The American Veterinary Medical Association has released important information concerning animals and COVID-19. That information can be found here. As we frequently remind you, this situation is rapidly evolving. Please check back for the latest published research findings as more information becomes available.

The World Small Animal Veterinary Association has released an updated advisory document today. That document can be viewed here.

Updated April 5, 2020, 8:50 p.m.
Today, news was released of a tiger at the Bronx Zoo testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19 in humans). Read the USDA’s statement on the tests that were conducted, as well as FAQs on animals and COVID-19 based on what is known about the virus at this time (including ‘Can people give this virus to animals?’ and ‘Should I avoid contact with pets and other animals?’) here.

Updated April 3, 2020, 7:26 p.m.
The World Small Animal Veterinary Association has released an updated advisory document today. That document can be viewed here.

Updated March 27, 2020, 9:47 p.m.
The World Small Animal Veterinary Association has released an updated advisory document today. Please view that document here.

Updated March 26, 2020, 10:45 a.m.
The World Small Animal Veterinary Association has kept current a second advisory document from March 20 (in addition to the document linked below) that no evidence exists that COVID-19 can be contracted from pets.

Updated March 20, 2020, 2:54 p.m.
Today, the World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) released an updated advisory document concerning COVID-19 and companion animals. Please find that document here >> .

Updated March 17, 2020, 11:57 a.m.
Yesterday, the World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) released an updated advisory document concerning COVID-19 and companion animals. Please find that document here >> .

March 12, 2020
As the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 increases in New York State and worldwide, the SPCA Serving Erie County is taking proactive measures to ensure the safety of people and animals on its premises.

The World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) is releasing advisory documents and information concerning animals and COVID-19. In an advisory document entitled The New Coronavirus and Companion Animals, it is stated, “You should restrict contact with pets and other animals while you are sick with COVID-19, just like you would around other people,” recommending that people sick with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the virus. “This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.”

Please regularly check for updates as more information becomes available.


The SPCA has cancelled events through April 30, 2020. Some of these events will be rescheduled. Cancelled events include but are not limited to:

April 8:                 Wake Up With Wildlife “Wildlife Rescue” seminar
For more information, contact SPCA Wildlife Director
Barbara Haney: 716-875-7360, ext. 220.

April 13-17:          School Break Camp
For more information, contact SPCA Humane Education Director
Christine Davis: 716-875-7360, ext. 262.

April 20:                “CBD and Pets” seminar
For more information, contact SPCA Humane Education Director
Christine Davis: 716-875-7360, ext. 262.

April 26:                 Paws at the Pub
For more information, contact Buffalo Brewpub: 716-632-0552.

March & April:   “Furry Tales Preschool Story and Adventure Time” sessions
For more information, contact SPCA Humane Education Director
Christine Davis: 716-875-7360, ext. 262.

March & April:   “Tale for Two” reading sessions
For more information, contact SPCA Humane Education Director
Christine Davis: 716-875-7360, ext. 262.

March & April:   Scout workshops
For more information, contact SPCA Humane Education Director
Christine Davis: 716-875-7360, ext. 262.

March & April:   New volunteer orientations
For more information, contact SPCA Volunteer Services Director Kelly Deschamps: 716-875-7360, ext. 232.

March & April:   Youth volunteer attendance and programs
For more information, contact SPCA Volunteer Services Director Kelly Deschamps: 716-875-7360, ext. 232.

June 2020:   Wine & Wags
For more information on our socially-distant FANIMAL Fundraiser, please contact Caitlin at the SPCA: CaitlinF@yourspca.org

If an SPCA Serving Erie County program or event on your calendar is not on this changeable list, please contact the SPCA at 716-875-7360 prior to attending for confirmation.

This is NOT a static list. As officials at the SPCA work to address the ever-changing health needs in our community, any new information will be released as soon as possible.


This page will be regularly updated with the most current developments at the SPCA Serving Erie County. Please check back frequently.

–Gina Lattuca, SPCA Chief Communications Officer

SPCA CONTINUES ‘TALE FOR TWO’ READING PROGRAM IN 2020

March 12, 2020: Program cancelled in March & April, 2020 in response to COVID-19 health concerns

January 7, 2020

By: SPCA Chief Communications Officer Gina Lattuca

Register your child for Tale for Two here >>

The SPCA Serving Erie County will continue its popular Tale for Two reading program throughout the 2020 school year!

Tale For Two encourages children ages 6 – 15 to read aloud to adoptable animals at the SPCA. Animals benefit from the increased socialization and reduced stress levels, while children work on their literacy and reading skills, building their self-esteem and confidence.

This year’s reading sessions, available in groups of 6 sessions (program cost: $40 for 6 sessions; discounts on additional sessions) or 12 sessions (program cost: $70 for 12 sessions; discounts on additional sessions) are available on Tuesdays, 4:30 p.m.-7 p.m. at the SPCA’s 300 Harlem Rd., West Seneca shelter. Sibling discounts are available. Reading sessions are 30 minutes in length.

Children can bring their own reading materials, or make a selection from the SPCA’s library.

Register your child for Tale for Two here >>

Please contact SPCA Humane Education Director Christine Davis with questions: HumaneEducation@yourspca.org.

See additional Tale for Two photos here >>

NO BONES ABOUT IT…KEEP PETS SAFE THIS THANKSGIVING

November 21, 2019
By: SPCA Chief Communications Officer Gina Lattuca

People aren’t the only ones looking forward to upcoming holiday dinners…the smell of Thanksgiving dinner is enough to drive any four-legged critter into a food frenzy.  The SPCA Serving Erie County has issued these holiday reminders to keep your pets safe, slim, and trim:

HUNGRY PETS: Too many holiday treats won’t only pack the pounds on us…they’ll pack them on our pets. Many pets are on standard, limited diets; feeding them large quantities of food they don’t normally receive could cause abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhea, none of which are welcome during this festive holiday…or at any other time, for that matter. Use discretion. Turkey bones are also dangerous for pets. A brittle, spiky bone could cause irritation of the stomach or intestines, or could lodge in your pet’s esophagus.
NOTE: Dogs eating foods to which they’re not accustomed may experience BLOAT, a life-threatening condition. Dogs experiencing bloat may have difficulty breathing, may appear weak and/or depressed, may attempt to vomit but cannot, and/or may appear to be extremely uncomfortable for no apparent reason. If your pet exhibits signs of bloat, bring him to a veterinarian as soon as possible. Speak with your veterinarian for more information on this condition.

NO BREAD FOR BARNEY:  Think twice before leaving that homemade bread dough atop the oven to rise. According to the ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control Center, when bread dough is ingested, an animal’s body heat causes the dough to rise in the stomach. As alcohol is produced during the rising process, the dough expands. Pets who have eaten bread dough may experience abdominal pain, vomiting, disorientation and depression.

PEANUT BUTTER WARNING: Using peanut butter as a holiday treat for your pet? Remember to check the label! Xylitol is a sugar substitute now added to some peanut butters and other foods and candies. It’s safe for most humans, but deadly to pets, even in small quantities! It’s also a bad idea to give any animal caffeine-laced peanut butter; serious health problems could ensue.


GARBAGE PICKERS?
  Some animals patiently wait for the chance to pick through the garbage when you’re not around. Aluminum foils with juices, plastic wraps with frostings, even tasty strings from tying turkeys…well, the temptation can just be too much for your deprived pets. Keep your garbage bags away from where pets can chew through them to get to the goods. Ingestion of these items can be life-threatening.

SWEET TEMPTATIONS: CHOCOLATE CAN BE FATAL TO PETS!  Chocolate contains a substance called Theobromine, a compound very similar to caffeine in structure. Theobromine can be toxic to dogs and cats in small quantities, causing vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, seizures, rapid and irregular heartbeats, muscle tremors, coma, even death. Keep chocolate safely away from all animals.

POTPOURRI PROBLEMS:  Of course we want our homes to smell nice when guests arrive…but be mindful that liquid and other types of potpourri, especially sprinkled into rugs, along with many scented essential candles and oils are toxic to dogs, cats, even birds and other animals.

For additional holiday medical reminders, speak with your veterinarian, or call the SPCA’s Lipsey Clinic: 716-531-4700.

Buffalo Bills Visit SPCA Veterans in NFL’s ‘Salute to Service’

November 13, 2019
By: SPCA Chief Communications Officer Gina Lattuca

On Tuesday, November 12, 2019, members of the Buffalo Bills visited veterans connected in some way with the SPCA Serving Erie County as part of the NFL’s ‘Salute to Service’ program!

From the Buffalo Bills: “In recognition of the NFL’s Salute to Service campaign, the Buffalo Bills joined local military veterans at the SPCA Serving Erie County on Tuesday to engage with adoptable animals, and promote the good work the SPCA does for our community. The SPCA’s Paws & Patriots program was developed for veterans in our community in need of giving and receiving special love and attention, and for animals at the SPCA who need exactly the same.”

Honored for past or current service were Joseph Browning, Brian Buck (with SPCA Paws for Love dog Sam), Bruce Clugston, Peter Cooley, Keith Foss, Gary Gonzalez, Dennis Hennessey, Timothy Joyner (with SPCA Paws for Love dog Bruno), Anthony Lattuca, Ray Mandel, John Miller, Allan Monaco (with SPCA Paws for Love dog Jake),  Richard Sansone (posthumous recognition), Steven Tuttle, and SPCA staff member Laura Zaranek.

Also on hand to add to the evening’s excitement were SPCA Paws for Love volunteers Brittany Betts (with Brody), Marcy Baumgarden (with Yankee and Dodger), and Deborah Williams (with Sam)!

The SPCA Serving Erie County extends a heartfelt thanks to the NFL and the Buffalo Bills for helping us honor veterans while shining a spotlight on the Paws and Patriots program here at the SPCA for the second year in a row.

If you are a veteran or active service man or woman and would like to learn more about the SPCA’s Paws and Patriots program, encouraging those who have served to work with SPCA shelter pets, please send an email to PawsandPatriots@yourspca.org.

Check out the Buffalo Bills’ photo album here, or by clicking the image below:

See WKBW-TV Ch. 7’s story here, or by clicking the image below:

See WIVB-TV Ch. 4’s story here, or by clicking the image below:

HALLOWEEN: NO TREAT FOR PETS

October 24, 2019
By: Gina Lattuca, SPCA Chief Communications Officer

WITH A FEW EXTRA PRECAUTIONS, PETS CAN HAVE A HAPPY HALLOWEEN TOO!

Halloween is meant to be fun for children of all ages, but according to the SPCA Serving Erie County, pets often experience the dark side of Halloween fun.  With extra precautions, seasonal problems can often be avoided:

NO CHOCOLATE for you! Just dog treats this Halloween!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-HUNGRY PETS:  CHOCOLATE CAN BE FATAL TO YOUR PET!  Please share this tip with children, who may be tempted to share their Halloween take with their best four-footed friends! The sweet smell of Halloween chocolate and other candy left by a door pleases pets, as do cookies and cakes served at Halloween parties. Sweets can cause diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain or worse.  Purchase Halloween treats made specifically for pets and keep the “people” treats away from where pets can reach them.

-PETS AS VICTIMS:  Halloween is traditionally known for trick-or-treaters…and pranksters.  KEEP ALL PETS INSIDE on Halloween night, and the nights immediately preceding and following October 31.  This will prevent them from being stolen, teased, kicked, blinded by flashlights or abused in other ways.

-NERVOUS/TERRITORIAL PETS:  Constant door-knocking or doorbell-ringing may cause an extremely nervous pet to shake or tremble uncontrollably, or have an “accident” in the house.  Territorial pets may become aggressive at the sound of unfamiliar visitors.  Keep nervous or territorial pets distracted in another room with the door closed.

-CURIOUS PETS:  Keep pets away from costume-making areas, where sequins or buttons can be swallowed.  Scissors used for cutting patterns, or knives used for carving jack o’lanterns, can harm your pet.  Also remember to keep pets away from a candle-illuminated jack o’lantern.  Halloween has become a popular season for decorations as well.  Keep decorations out of your pet’s reach, or securely attached in place to prevent your pet from pulling the decorations down.  Swallowing a decorative object may cause intestinal problems and present a potential emergency.

-KEEP CURRENT ID ON PETS: Exuberant or nervous pets may bolt out doors opened for trick-or-treat candy handouts. Ensure they are wearing proper identification (even if they are microchipped) in case they become lost. Collars are available for purchase at the SPCA Petique, located at the 300 Harlem Rd., West Seneca shelter, and other pet supply shops. If you lose or find a pet, visit the SPCA’s Lost & Found page for tips on what to do next.

Contact the SPCA Serving Erie County with any questions or concerns: 716-875-7360.

Additional dates:

Session 1: Filled

Session 2:
October 22, 29, November 5, 12

Session 3: November 19, 26, December 3, 10

For more information, contact SPCA Humane Educator Katherine Gillette-Cockerill at (716) 875-7360, ext. 234 or KatherineG@yourspca.org.

SEE ALL THE CAMP INFORMATION AND REGISTER YOUR CHILD BY CLICKING THE IMAGE BELOW!

SPCA LAUNCHES ‘TALE FOR TWO’ SUMMER READING CHALLENGE SCHEDULE; PROGRAM ENCOURAGES CHILDREN TO READ TO SHELTER PETS

May 28, 2019
By: SPCA Chief Communications Officer Gina Lattuca


(6/10/19: Tale for Two summer orientation dates have passed, but you can register children any time for the challenge! Just contact Humane Education Director Christine Davis: HumaneEducation@yourspca.org.)

The SPCA Serving Erie County will present its first annual Tale for Two Summer Reading Challenge this year, with prizes for children who read multiple books!

Tale For Two encourages children ages 6 – 15 to read aloud to adoptable animals at the SPCA. Animals benefit from the increased socialization and reduced stress levels, while children work on their literacy and reading skills, building their self-esteem and confidence.

This summer’s reading challenge sessions, available in groups of 6 (program cost $40) or 12 (program cost $70), are available on Tuesdays, June 18 – September 3, 5 p.m. – 8 p.m. at the SPCA’s 300 Harlem Rd., West Seneca shelter. Reading sessions are 30 minutes in length.

Children in kindergarten through fifth grade who read three books will receive a certificate of achievement, an SPCA pencil, and a wristband; five books earn the certificate, pencil, and humane-themed book; seven books earn the certificate, book, and an SPCA
T-shirt.

Children in grades six through 11 who read two books receive the certificate, pencil, and wristband; three books earn the certificate, book, and T-shirt; and five books earn the certificate, book, and an SPCA sweatshirt.

Children can bring their own reading materials, or make a selection from the SPCA’s library.

Readers and parents/guardians are required to attend one hour-long orientation session at the SPCA either Thursday, May 30,
5 p.m. or Saturday,
June
8, 3 p.m. (Please see below for information on how to register children for the challenge after June 8.)

Register for the Tale for Two Summer Reading Challenge and one orientation session right here >> (orientation dates have passed, but you can still register children for the challenge! Just contact Humane Education Director Christine Davis: HumaneEducation@yourspca.org.)

 

Please contact SPCA Humane Education Director Christine Davis with questions: HumaneEducation@yourspca.org.

See additional Tale for Two photos here >>

See the story on WKBW-TV’s website >>

 

Student Winners of SPCA Humane Poster & Creative Writing Contest Honored at Ceremony

May 9, 2019
Submitted by: SPCA Humane Education Department

Last night, area children were honored at a special ceremony at the SPCA’s 300 Harlem Rd., West Seneca shelter. The students won prizes in the SPCA’s 2019 Humane Poster & Creative Writing Contest.

This year’s student winners are:

The Anderson/Lowe Award for Artistic Ability:
Joseph Jordan – Buffalo, NY

The Stevens/Barrett Award for Creative Writing:
Louisa Gascoyne – East Aurora, NY

Most Creative Entry:
Ivyana Dragoo Depew, NY

Division 1 (I)
1st Owen Braley – Tapestry Charter School
2nd Christian Eckrote – Valley Community Center
3rd Isabella Dustin – Valley Community Center
Honorable Mention: Natalie Sprandel – Tonawanda, NY

Division 2 (II)
1st Oliver Bennett – Immaculate Conception School
2nd Mathew Mysiak – Holland, NY
3rd Pender Maya –Tapestry Charter School
Honorable Mention: Elise Murphy – Buffalo, NY

Division 3 (III)
1st Ceciella Giallella – Immaculate Conception School
2nd Sophia Costanzo – Orchard Park, NY
3rd Kaylie Kratz – St. Josephs School
Honorable Mention: Abbey Root – St. Joseph’s School

Division 4 (IV)
1st Sipharah Mast – Buffalo NY
2nd Kayla Dorman –Pathways Academy
3rd Amaya Fenandez – Buffalo, NY

Division 5 (V)
1st Shane Connolly – Stanley G. Falk School
2nd Haley Goodrich – Stanley G. Falk School
3rd Shadow Young – Stanley G. Falk School
Honorable Mentions:
Joseph Maracle – Stanley Makowski School
Jeremiah Garner – Stanley G. Falk School

Other winners include the Judy Silver Educator of the Year, Diane Evans, and this year’s Ambassador of Kindness, Vivian Guard.

For information on how you, your child/children, your class, or your school can become involved in the 2020 student competition, please contact SPCA Humane Educator Danielle Talbot at 716-875-7360, ext. 245 or daniellet@yourspca.org.